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prostheticknowledge:

Glitch Inspired Paintings by South Korean Artist Woopsyang (웁쓰양)

Photoset

prostheticknowledge:

de/Rastra by Kyle Evans

Old television turned into real-time oscillographic synthesizer, reminiscent of Nam June Paik:

The de/Rastra oscillographic synthesizer is a real-time audio/video instrument and computer-interfacing device that allows a performer to generate visualizations intrinsic to cathode ray tube technology while simultaneously creating the acoustic analog of the displayed imagery. By way of building, bending and mutilating, de/Rastra shows the effects of altering the anatomical makeup of a CRT television, revealing the intrinsically hidden potentials of the technology through the repurposing and restructuring of its own ability. Through hacking and exploiting the capabilities intrinsic to all CRT devices, the technology becomes repurposed as a performative interface, breaking down the device’s ‘consumption only’ nature. The performer is given control over the technology by removing it from the intended application and forcing it into an active state through a combination of physical and mental effort. The de/Rastra oscillographic synthesizer is an open source project and will eventually be accompanied by tutorials on methods of CRT hacking. 

[Project Home Page]

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"Pattern recognition is the new form of work which combines into one the roles of hunter, engineer, programmer, researcher, and aesthete."

Marshall McLuhan (via prostheticknowledge)

(via prostheticknowledge)

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fastcompany:

Zynga, a publicly traded company, is trying to prove it spent hundreds of millions of dollars on more than just a blank piece of paper and a few digital crayons. Yesterday, the company’s advertising platform for Draw Something was unveiled for the first time—and, if not handled with some finesse, it’s a great potential example of forced brand interaction.
Advertisers now have the option to purchase drawing terms related to their brands. When a user opens Draw Something, the game gives three options to choose from—say, tennis, pancake, or snowball—which players then doodle for a friend, who in turn has to guess what that user has drawn. Soon, however, users will start to see brands among the fun options typically available—imagine trying to draw Hewlett-Packard or Toyota—which could quickly turn the game into a mobile version of Brand Tags. The NHL is one of the earliest advertisers on the platform, hoping to promote the Stanley Cup playoffs. But not all brands are as player-friendly as the hockey league.
Read more->

fastcompany:

Zynga, a publicly traded company, is trying to prove it spent hundreds of millions of dollars on more than just a blank piece of paper and a few digital crayons. Yesterday, the company’s advertising platform for Draw Something was unveiled for the first time—and, if not handled with some finesse, it’s a great potential example of forced brand interaction.

Advertisers now have the option to purchase drawing terms related to their brands. When a user opens Draw Something, the game gives three options to choose from—say, tennis, pancake, or snowball—which players then doodle for a friend, who in turn has to guess what that user has drawn. Soon, however, users will start to see brands among the fun options typically available—imagine trying to draw Hewlett-Packard or Toyota—which could quickly turn the game into a mobile version of Brand Tags. The NHL is one of the earliest advertisers on the platform, hoping to promote the Stanley Cup playoffs. But not all brands are as player-friendly as the hockey league.

Read more->

(via untitled-mag)

Quote
"A paradigm shift occurred in the 1960s: the cognitive revolution. Since that time it has become respectable to study cognition, although emotion and motivation were still considered suspect by many experimental psychologists. An integral part of the cognitive revolution was the computer metaphor for brain function. Psychological research during the past 40 years has been dominated by an information-processing model of brain function based on the computer metaphor."

Unplugging the Computer Metaphor | Psychology Today

Technology becomes metaphors; repeat.

(via new-aesthetic)

(via new-aesthetic)

Link

What’s up with this New Aesthetic stuff?

Is it pretty much baloney? It sounds like baloney…

Maybe I just don’t feel like trying to Get it.

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"If you look at top 10 websites in the US, over 80% of their traffic is now foreign. If you look at China, in the last 3 years more people connected to the Internet than the entire population of the US. It means that there is a major inflection point happening right now with the Internet, with 5 more billion people connecting. They are just like us, but they are Poor, Hungry and Driven – I call them PHDs. They are self-skilling, they are self-motivated and the first thing they want is a job, because their average wage is $8 a day or less – in some cases, less than $2. So when they go online, they are looking for a job, and Freelancer is at the forefront of that."

Freelancer’s CEO Matt Barrie: Outsourcing Creates Entrepreneurs (via thenextweb)

(via thenextweb)

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thenextweb:

(via The Rise and Fall of Caring About Kony)
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joachimvlieghe:

A rhetorical approach to ‘new media’ and ‘new media studies’?

The signs are growing that the once-anarchic, perhaps emancipatory internet is subject to increasing attempts to privatize, commercialise, control and profit from the activities of consumers online. Some of these are defended as…

(Source: eprints.lse.ac.uk)

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Patton Oswalt Vs. Compulsory Amateur Documentation Vs. A Very Confusing Economy For Jokes

RE: "That One Time When Patton Oswalt Was An Asshole", Barbara Gray

Barbara Gray wrote a blog post concerning Patton Oswalt’s dispatching and ridiculing of an audience member for filming his set. It’s an interesting read on a polarizing event.
Short version: This young lady found Patton Oswalt to be rude at her show, and we’ll just have to form our own opinions once he places a response later today. I may have reacted bluntly and rudely on Twitter towards the backlash against this very basic piece of celebrity event journalism. Gray’s indignant reaction to Oswalt’s behavior at her show seems, to me, reasonable and worth expressing online.

However, I have no interest in putting Oswalt’s behavior on trial myself. It just disturbs me to see innocent admiration mistaken for greed and malice, and I feel this is an issue that will rear it’s head more frequently as time goes on (especially in the world of stand-up comedy).


For me, this is a matter of media habits and environments (cellphone-videoing and Youtube, respectively) being feared and misunderstood. I’ll write in more detail about this later on.